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Four imams are accused of ‘trying to convert Muslims’

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Four imam leaders have been accused of “trying” to convert the Muslim community and of “wanting to change the way Muslims behave” by “releasing their views”, according to a complaint lodged with the Public Prosecution Service (PPS).

Four imams – Suleyman Muhammad, Rafi Al-Mubarak, Farah Al-Nuraimi and Hoda al-Qadri – are accused by the Crown Prosecution of “engaging in acts of extremism, spreading hate speech and intimidating others” with “their extremist ideology”.

The complaint, filed on behalf of five individuals – three Muslims and one Christian – also accuses them of “fraudulent and unlawful conduct, including the wilful breach of trust”.

“They have tried in their speeches to make their point by saying that Islam is peace and good. “

The imams have attempted to convert others to their extremist ideology,” the complaint alleges.

“They have tried in their speeches to make their point by saying that Islam is peace and good.

According to the complaint, the imams were “working towards the conversion of Muslims by promoting and encouraging radical, extreme and racist views and opinions”. “

These imams attempt to ‘reclaim’ the religious heritage of Muslims.”

According to the complaint, the imams were “working towards the conversion of Muslims by promoting and encouraging radical, extreme and racist views and opinions”.

One of the six accused, Rabi Al-Tahiri, is a cleric at the Suleymah mosque in Istanbul.

The other four imams, all of whom are also Muslims, are known as “Hoda”, “Nuram” and “Rafi”.

The five are also alleged to have been members of a “group known as the Al-Sadiqiyya”, which “has been involved in spreading Islamophobic, violent, anti-Semitic and racist messages” for several years.

They are also accused of distributing “hate literature” to “terrorise the community”, “encouraging violence against non-Muslims”, and “fomenting hatred and violence against the Muslim majority”.

They have also “engaged in acts that threaten the peace and security of the Turkish society” and the “continues to incite and incite others to commit acts of violence”, according the complaint.

It also alleges that they “continue to propagate the idea of the Quran being the sole and final source of law, justice and morality” and have “fostered hatred towards and animosity towards Muslims”.

“The members of the Al-‘Sadiqiya group have continued to promote violent, violent ideologies and activities”, the complaint claims.

However, it adds that the accused have been “indicted on a number of other charges”.

On Tuesday, Turkey’s highest religious authority said the charges were “completely unjustified”.

Niyaz Karmal, head of the Council of Senior Religious Officers, told reporters that the accusations are “not just baseless, but completely unfounded and unjustified”, adding that the allegations are “based on the distorted views of the imam who is not a member of the Muslim Community”.

“This is not the first time the imah [religious authority] has issued these allegations against the imaams,” Karmar added.

Karmal also said that the Council would “continue with its investigation” into the allegations.

Ankara’s top religious leader, Aysegul Bayik, told Turkish media on Wednesday that the charges are “completely unfounded”.

He said the imas are “working for the good of the country and people” and that “in order to protect the community and the people, they should not be convicted”.

“We will continue with our investigation, because it is in our interest to make sure that this issue is not being exploited by the public,” he added.

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